Articles by: Carl Cannon

Banneker’s Plea

Banneker’s Plea

on August 9, 2018, 8:46 AM / in History

Good morning. It’s Thursday, August 9, 2018. On this date in 1791, an aspiring American author was putting the final touches on a book that would introduce him to the world as a man of science — and much more. But the budding writer would need help getting his work into print, and so he sent the manuscript — an […]

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Union Faceoff

on August 3, 2018, 7:58 AM / in History

Good morning, it’s Friday, August 3, 2018. On this date in 1981, America’s 13,000 air traffic controllers went on strike. Four hours later, Ronald Reagan walked into the Rose Garden flanked by Attorney General William French Smith and Secretary of Transportation Drew Lewis to announce that any controller who did not return to work in 48 hours would be fired. […]

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The News According to Real Clear Politics, August 1, 2018

The News According to Real Clear Politics, August 1, 2018

on August 1, 2018, 7:47 AM / in National News, Opinion

A Vote for Trump Was a Vote to Elevate Kavanaugh. Scott Walter advises liberals opposing the Supreme Court nominee to reflect on the words of President Obama: “Elections have consequences.” Americans Largely Agree on Abortion Limits. Jeanne Mancini writes that simple up-or-down polls about Roe v. Wade miss the consensus that has been building on the issue. Obama Feds Embraced […]

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The News According to Real Clear Politics, July 27th 2018

The News According to Real Clear Politics, July 27th 2018

on July 27, 2018, 8:30 AM / in National News

Ocasio-Cortez, the GOP’s Midterm Boogeyman? Caitlin Huey-Burns explores Republican efforts to portray the Democratic Socialist as the radical face of the Democratic Party. Fake Views? Page FISA Warrant Shows We’re Doomed. A.B. Stoddard considers the divergent — yet righteous — conclusions arrived at by Democrats and Republicans examining the same document. Access to Digital Economy Seen as Key in Rural […]

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HHH in ’68

HHH in ’68

on July 27, 2018, 8:28 AM / in History

Good morning, it’s Friday, July 27, 2018. Fifty years ago today, Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey delivered a stump speech at the state Democratic Party convention in Utah. Although not particularly newsworthy, even at the time, reading it half a century later is instructive for reasons I’ll discuss in a moment. But to offer a teaser, I spotted rhetorical precursors […]

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The News and Opinions of Real Clear Politics Monday, July 23, 2018

The News and Opinions of Real Clear Politics Monday, July 23, 2018

on July 23, 2018, 7:38 AM / in National News

Revenge of the Deep State. In a column, I consider the aftermath of President Trump’s press conference with Vladimir Putin, particularly comments made by John Brennan, James Clapper and James Comey. Russia Mania Is the Birtherism of the Left. Steve Cortes argues that the leap from “Trump is too soft on Russia” to “Trump is a compromised Russian agent” is […]

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When Harry Wrote Bess

on July 23, 2018, 7:35 AM / in History

Good morning, it’s Monday, July 23, 2018. One hundred years ago today, a letter from a U.S. Army captain stationed in France began making its way to his girlfriend in Missouri. The officer’s name was Capt. O’Truman — at least that’s what his military adjutant half-jokingly said it ought to be, since he was the battery commander in an artillery […]

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The News According to Real Clear Politics Monday July 16, 2018

The News According to Real Clear Politics Monday July 16, 2018

on July 16, 2018, 7:52 AM / in National News

The Supreme Court and Original Sin. In a column, I consider how Roe v. Wade was the case that warped the judicial appointment process in this country. The Abortion War Will Soon Rip America in Two. Bill Scher worries that a Supreme Court vote to either repeal or affirm Roe v. Wade will widen the culture war chasm. Let’s Not […]

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Meter Man

on July 16, 2018, 7:50 AM / in History

Good morning, it’s Monday, July 16, 2018. Eighty-three years ago today, a maddening — if functional — invention appeared on the streets of our country. It was an American innovation and made its debut in Oklahoma’s capital. The new contraption was the parking meter. During World War I, only 3,000 private automobiles were registered in Oklahoma City and the surrounding […]

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Thoreau’s Way

Thoreau’s Way

on July 12, 2018, 8:33 AM / in History

Good morning, it’s Thursday, July 12, 2018. At the NATO summit in Europe, Donald Trump has treated Europeans to a rhetorical formulation already known to many Americans. “I’m very consistent,” the 45th U.S. president told a reporter from Croatia. “I’m a very stable genius.” That got me to wondering this morning. Not about Ralph Waldo Emerson’s observation about “foolish consistency” […]

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The News According to RealClear Politics July 6th 2018

The News According to RealClear Politics July 6th 2018

on July 6, 2018, 7:59 AM / in National News, Opinion

Ranking Trump’s Supreme Court Choices. Sean Trende assesses the seven reported finalists. How a Bernie-Backed Venture Capitalist Won in Md. Ross Baird and Ben Wrobel write that Democratic gubernatorial primary winner Ben Jealous scored with a message bullish on what free markets can achieve but critical of a broken economy. Business Needs Defense-Grade Cyber Capabilities. In Part 10 of our […]

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Arch Ward’s Stellar Idea

on July 6, 2018, 7:56 AM / in History

Good morning, it’s Friday, July 6, 2018. Today is George W. Bush’s birthday, his first since losing his mother. I covered Dubya for nearly eight years when he was in the White House and once had a warm conversation with him about Barbara Bush, so my thoughts are with him today. This date is also the anniversary of an event […]

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Elvis Bridges the Divide

Elvis Bridges the Divide

on July 5, 2018, 7:43 AM / in History

Good morning, it’s Thursday, July 5, 2018. We’re a week into a heat wave here on the East Coast, but I hope you had an enjoyable and meaningful Fourth of July nonetheless. Sixty-four years ago today at a Sun Records’ studio in Memphis, a white guitar player added some tempo to an existing African-American rhythm and blues number and helped […]

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JFK’s Proposal

JFK’s Proposal

on June 25, 2018, 8:33 AM / in History

Good morning, it’s Monday, June 25, 2018. Sixty-five years ago today, an engagement notice appeared in many of the nation’s newspapers: A charismatic U.S. senator had popped the question to a young Washington journalist. A September wedding date was set. The future bride and groom each came from a prominent and wealthy Catholic family. Sen. John F. Kennedy, freshman Democrat […]

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The News, According to Real Clear Politics

The News, According to Real Clear Politics

on June 19, 2018, 7:28 AM / in National News

White House Digs In on Family Separation Policy. Caitlin Huey-Burns wraps up yesterday’s tumult in Washington and along the southern border as the administration held firm on its tough enforcement of immigration laws. Title X Rule Will Hurt Planned Parenthood, But Help Women. Grazie Pozo Christie defends the change in funding proposed by the Trump administration. On Blue Waves, Red […]

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Mutually Assured Disarmament

Mutually Assured Disarmament

on June 19, 2018, 7:23 AM / in History

Hello, it’s Tuesday, June 19, 2018. On this date in 1980, Washington Post readers were offered a counterintuitive story in their morning paper. Ronald Reagan, having clinched the Republican presidential nomination, met with a group of Post editors and writers for lunch the day before, where he made news. Hosted by esteemed Post publisher Katharine Graham, the session lasted about […]

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Bunker Hill Hero

Bunker Hill Hero

on June 18, 2018, 7:56 AM / in History

Good morning. It’s Monday, June 18, 2018. On this date 243 years ago, Abigail Adams wrote an agonized letter to her husband. John Adams was in Philadelphia at the Continental Congress. Abigail was at their house in Braintree, Massachusetts. From there she could hear the artillery raging in the Battle of Bunker Hill. The letter opens with her signature salutation […]

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the Natural

on June 15, 2018, 8:41 AM / in History, People

Good morning. It’s Friday, June 15, 2018. Last night, the baseball gods were on duty at the annual Congressional Baseball Game played at Nationals Park. Although President Trump declined an invitation (he had an excuse: It was his 72nd birthday), Rep. Steve Scalise of Louisiana was there, along with four other victims of last year’s shooting by a political zealot […]

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The News According to Real Clear Politics

The News According to Real Clear Politics

on June 14, 2018, 8:23 AM / in National News

Why Fact Checkers Need to Accept That They Can Err. Kalev Leetaru examines the limited avenues of recourse the subjects of negative fact checks have to dispute rulings they believe are inaccurate. Women and Cyber. In our latest cybersecurity podcast, former Homeland Security official Phyllis Schneck discusses her pioneering role in the cyber defense realm. Religious Freedom Isn’t Baked Into […]

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O Say Can You Hear

on June 14, 2018, 8:21 AM / in History

Good morning. It’s Thursday, June 14, 2018. On this date in 1777, the Continental Congress adopted the Stars and Stripes as our national emblem. For the past century, U.S. presidents have sought to associate themselves closely with that badge of honor — and that date. Woodrow Wilson first proclaimed June 14 to be “Flag Day” in 1916. In 1949, Harry […]

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