History

The Unraveling of Sykes-Picot

The Unraveling of Sykes-Picot

on May 28, 2013, 9:58 AM / in History, National News, News

The thrice-promised land it has been called. It is that land north of Mecca and Medina and south of Anatolia, between the Mediterranean Sea and the Persian Gulf. In 1915 – that year of Gallipoli, which forced the resignation of First Lord of the Admiralty Winston Churchill – Britain, to win Arab support for its war against the Ottoman Turks, […]

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Memorial Day 2010 VFW Post 1848 Jackson Tennessee / Jerry Bastin

Memorial Day 2010 VFW Post 1848 Jackson Tennessee / Jerry Bastin

on May 27, 2013, 5:54 AM / in History

A speech given by County Commissioner Jerry Bastin in 2010 where he addressed a group of VFW vets in Jackson three Memorial days ago. I thought that I would share his thoughts with you. It is an honor that I do so. In the village of Waterloo, New York, on May 5, 1866 the town was decorated with flags at […]

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A Timeline of Islamic Expansion In The Dark Ages

A Timeline of Islamic Expansion In The Dark Ages

on May 23, 2013, 6:21 AM / in History

By: Dan McLaughlin By The Sword Let me put down here some facts that are worth returning to from time to time, as arguments over the history of Islam and Islamism are back in the news with today’s beheading in London.  In debates over the history of tension between Muslims and Christians, the Crusades are often cited, out of their […]

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The Frontier: America’s First Welfare Program

on May 17, 2013, 6:05 AM / in History

by Ryan McMaken When discussing various atrocities committed against the Native Americans throughout history, apologists for this particular type of state-sponsored killing will often resort to pointing out that Indians murdered many settlers and their families. This claim, which is true enough, really only begs the question, however, of why white Americans were on Indian lands to begin with. The […]

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A Very Private Meeting

A Very Private Meeting

on May 17, 2013, 5:45 AM / in History

“Alright fellas, listen up. It’s almost the end of 1910 and we only have three years to polish and refine our final preparations for taking over the government of the United States. As you all know, we engineered the fake “Bank Panic of 1907” to scare the pants off the public and put many of our competitors out of business. […]

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The New Deal’s True Legacy

The New Deal’s True Legacy

on May 15, 2013, 7:14 AM / in History, National News, News

Chapter 9 – The Great Deformation – The Corruption of Capitalism in America by David Stockman The new deal did not address the causes of the depression,  even if its work relief and other humanitarian measures did ameliorate for millions of citizens the terrible costs of its unnecessary prolongation. Still, most of this safety net consisted of ad hoc programs, such as […]

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V-E Day and the Greatest Celebration

V-E Day and the Greatest Celebration

on May 9, 2013, 8:06 AM / in History

Dear Brigade, I thought you might appreciate this article written by my husband [of 43 years] Nate. He is former USMC 1971-1975. His Dad recently passed away and this article is about his father and his “Band of Brothers” at Hitler’s Eagles Nest on V-E Day in 1945.  As Always, For the Cause – Linda V-E Day and the Greatest […]

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Remembering a Great Patriot

Remembering a Great Patriot

on May 6, 2013, 9:27 AM / in History, National News, News

The Foundation “I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. ‘Tis the business of little minds to shrink; but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.” –Thomas Paine Inspiration “Sunday, April 28, mark[ed] the 255th anniversary of President […]

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Letter to Holder

on May 6, 2013, 8:28 AM / in History, Opinion

C/O Jackie Juntti It appears that Attorney General Holder sent Gov. Brownback of Kansas, a letter citing the Supremacy Clause in justifying the federal enforcement of gun laws in the states. This is what I would have sent him in return were I in a position to do so. Attorney General Eric Holder Office of the Attorney General Washington, D.C. […]

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Nisbet vs. Plato and Rousseau

on May 4, 2013, 6:27 AM / in History, Opinion

by Gary North GaryNorth.com Is civil government the only true government? Does it alone possess legitimate sovereignty? Defenders of the modern state insist that this is the case, and that it should be the case. Robert Nisbet, as a sociologist, looked to social organizations as the source of political tradition. He explained the rise of the modern state in terms of […]

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The Meaning of A Date

on May 4, 2013, 4:22 AM / in History, National News, News

In a variation of word association, the list* below should prompt you to make some very common associations… First of January 14th of February 17th of March Fifth of May 14th of June 4th of July 25th of December You may remember playing a game as a child called “which one doesn’t belong”, and perhaps even the little jingle that […]

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This Day in History May 3rd

This Day in History May 3rd

on May 3, 2013, 6:37 AM / in History

In 1481, The largest of three earthquakes strikes the island of Rhodes and causes an estimated 30,000 casualties. In 1491, Kongo monarch Nkuwu Nzinga is baptised by Portuguese missionaries, adopting the baptismal name of João I. In 1791, The Constitution of May 3 (the first modern constitution in Europe) is proclaimed by the Sejm of Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 1802, Washington, […]

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Judge Declares National Day of Prayer Unconstitutional

Judge Declares National Day of Prayer Unconstitutional

on May 2, 2013, 4:23 AM / in History, Opinion

Three years ago today I copied this article as a reminder how we have pandered to the judicial few. Because of its age I have published this in its entirety. It seems that there is always someone, somewhere, that views symbolic issues as declarations of hatred. I can not for the life of me understand these individuals. The original article is by […]

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Quote for Today

on May 1, 2013, 2:53 PM / in History

“When you see that trading is done, not by consent, but by compulsion” When you see that in order to produce, you need to obtain permission from men who produce nothing When you see that money is flowing to those who deal, not in goods, but in favors When you see that men get richer by graft and by pull […]

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This Day in History May 1st

This Day in History May 1st

on May 1, 2013, 9:31 AM / in History

In 1544, Turkish troops occupy Hungary. In 1701, the Act of Union is enacted; England, Wales and Scotland form the United Kingdom of Great Britain. In 1704, the Boston Newsletter published the first newspaper ad. In 1707, England and Scotland were unified by legislation. There has been an independence movement in Scotland ever since. In 1715, Prussia declares war on […]

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Susan B. Anthony ‘I deplore the horrible crime of child-murder…’

Susan B. Anthony ‘I deplore the horrible crime of child-murder…’

on March 14, 2013, 6:00 AM / in History

Susan B. Anthony, whose face is on a U.S. dollar coin, a 3-cent stamp and whose statue is in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda, died MARCH 13, 1906. Raised a Quaker, her father owned a cotton mill and refused to buy cotton from farmers who owned slaves. Susan B. Anthony’s religious upbringing instilled in her the concept that every one is […]

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This Day in History March 11th

This Day in History March 11th

on March 11, 2013, 6:19 AM / in History

In 105, A.D., Ts’ai Lun invented paper. He made it from bamboo, mulberry, and other fibers, along with bamboo, fish nets and rags. Then he sat around for literally centuries and waited for someone to invent ink. In 222 – Emperor Elagabalus is assassinated, along with his mother, Julia Soaemias, by the Praetorian Guard during a revolt. Their mutilated bodies […]

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Van T. Barfoot

Van T. Barfoot

on March 6, 2013, 3:52 PM / in History, People

I just recieved an email…. that moved around the country last year at this time….. celebrating the life of man, a soldier, a husband and a father. This is his story: Van Thomas Barfoot (born Van Thurman Barfoot; June 15, 1919 – March 2, 2012) was a United States Army officer and a recipient of the United States military’s highest […]

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Quote for Today

on February 25, 2013, 10:20 AM / in History

The philosopher carries his soul in his head, the poet in his heart, the singer in his throat and the dancer in her body. A politician is a lost soul and without voters, a mere scam. While I not sure the author, I have to thank  A. J. Floyd for sending this one. It reminds me of a Quote of Emerson: […]

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One Reason Dollars Ain’t Worth What They Used to Be

on February 23, 2013, 9:15 AM / in History, National News, News, Opinion

Editor’s Note: In this Heartlander article from The Foundation for Economic Freedom, Lawrence W. Reed examines the history of private coinage in the United States. In the article, Reed argues that private coinage was not banned because it did not work, but because the government did not want the competition. “Private coinage was banned not because it didn’t work but […]

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