History

Do you Remember This?

Do you Remember This?

on October 27, 2016, 6:29 AM / in History

I was once criticized for speaking about my knowledge of computer history by a local snit, but how many of you remember this. The Family Computer Disk System is a peripheral for Nintendo‘s Family Computer home video game console released in Japan in 1986. It allows users to play one of more than 200 games using proprietary floppy disks called […]

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Bud Dunn / Tennessee Walking Horse

Bud Dunn / Tennessee Walking Horse

on October 26, 2016, 6:00 AM / in History, People

Bud Dunn (1918–2001) was an American horse trainer who specialized in training and showing Tennessee Walking Horses. Born in 1918 on a farm in Scott County, Kentucky, he later moved to Florence, Alabama, where he owned and operated Bud Stables, a show horse training stable that produced twenty World Championships. He additionally trained and rode two horses who won the […]

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Why I Won’t Vote In November

Why I Won’t Vote In November

on October 3, 2016, 6:00 AM / in History, Opinion

By Neal Ross  /  Neal’s Soapbox For the past hour or so I’ve been hearing in the background a PBS television documentary on the lives of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. For what purpose PBS aired this show; to cause people to empathize with either of them, or to garner sympathy for them I cannot honestly say. All I know […]

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Trump, Now What?

Trump, Now What?

on May 15, 2016, 7:33 AM / in History, National News, Opinion

From Self-Promoter to Statesman? I have written that I will vote for Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton. And I have a sense that many genuine conservatives are, like me, A-B-C voters: Anyone But Clinton. However, allow me to give you some context for the A-B-C rationale. Jimmy Carter’s first two years as president coincided with my last two years as […]

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Harper Lee, Author of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird,’ Dead at 89

Harper Lee, Author of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird,’ Dead at 89

on February 19, 2016, 11:53 AM / in History, People

Harper Lee, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” a literary classic about racial injustice in the Jim Crow South, has died, her publisher said. The famously reclusive Lee, 89, had been living in an assisted living facility since suffering a stroke in 2007 that forced her to move home from New York, where she had lived for […]

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Roy Exum: The Circuit Is Clear

Roy Exum: The Circuit Is Clear

on February 1, 2016, 8:54 AM / in History, People

This is a neat, amazing story about the P-51 from a news man here in Chattanooga. My dad was in an assisted living in Ooltewah with a guy in an electric chair who was somewhat short. He was had a 6 foot flag that flew behind his chair. I was told later that he was a former P-51 pilot and […]

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Gary Hart, Sarah Palin, Ross Perot to Be Featured in New PBS Docu ’16 for ’16’

Gary Hart, Sarah Palin, Ross Perot to Be Featured in New PBS Docu ’16 for ’16’

on January 19, 2016, 5:42 AM / in History, National News

By Debra Birnbaum The road to the White House has famously been littered with candidates who’ve dominated headlines, for better or worse — and PBS is bringing them back with the new documentary “16 for ’16” (working title). Sarah Palin, Gary Hart, Ross Perot are among those who will be featured in the multi-part series, which spotlights presidential and vice-presidential candidates […]

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The 15 biggest scandals of 2015

The 15 biggest scandals of 2015

on December 29, 2015, 9:31 AM / in History, National News

By Sarah Westwood  /  Washington Examiner In a year marked by private email shenanigans and undercover videos, political scandals that might have shocked the public any other time seemed relatively tame. But public figures from all levels were up to no good in 2015, wasting taxpayer money and trying to cover their tracks at every turn. While this timeline of […]

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Will Elites Blow Up the GOP?

Will Elites Blow Up the GOP?

on December 15, 2015, 7:12 AM / in History, Opinion

“Buchanan, if you ever hear of a group getting together to stop X, be sure to put your money on X.” So, Richard Nixon told me half a century ago, after he had been badly burned in just such a futile and failed enterprise. It was the Cleveland Governors Conference of 1964. Sen. Barry Goldwater had just defeated Gov. Nelson […]

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Can You Guess Who I am?

on December 12, 2015, 5:30 AM / in History

Ephesians 5:6 and 7 “Let no one deceive you with empty words, for because of these things the wrath of God comes upon the sons of disobedience.  Therefore do not be partakers with them.” Special thanks to Andy

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The Sword is pretty mighty as well

The Sword is pretty mighty as well

on December 10, 2015, 7:21 AM / in History, State News

We reported this story back in 2006 and just thought you might enjoy the irony even today. Residents of a house in Memphis, Tenn., were awakened by a home-invasion robbery. Two men burst in and started shooting. During the robbery one of the victims grabbed a sword and swung it at one robber’s gun just as he was about to […]

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Quote for Today

Quote for Today

on November 30, 2015, 5:30 AM / in History

A politician needs the ability to foretell what is going to happen tomorrow, next week, next month, and next year. And to have the ability afterwards to explain why it didn’t happen. Winston Churchill

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Some Birthdays for Today September 20th

Some Birthdays for Today September 20th

on September 20, 2015, 5:30 AM / in History

Phillip Phillips turns 24 – He won the eleventh season of American Idol, and was nominated for a Billboard Music Award for The World from the Side of the Moon. Sophia Loren turns 80 – Lovely Italian actress who won an Oscar and an Academy Award for her role in the 1962 film, Two Women and later starred in Courage and […]

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Federal Reserve PAYS NO TAXES!

on May 29, 2015, 5:30 AM / in History

According to Wikipedia, the Federal Reserve System (also known as the Federal Reserve, and informally as the Fed) is the central banking system of the United States. It was created on December 23, 1913, with the enactment of the Federal Reserve Act, largely in response to a series of financial panics, particularly a severe panic in 1907. Over time, the […]

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The Great Generation of Hollywood Heros

The Great Generation of Hollywood Heros

on April 25, 2015, 5:30 AM / in History, People

Special thanks to Basil for recommending the site and info… In contrast to the ideals, opinions and feelings of today’s “Hollywood” the real actors of our past loved their country, the United States.  They exhibited characteristics of class and integrity.  With the advent of World War II, many of our actors enlisted in the military to fight rather than stand and rant […]

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When We Lost the Winnable War

When We Lost the Winnable War

on April 19, 2015, 6:22 AM / in History, Opinion

Editor’s Note: Not only could we have won in Vietnam, but we should have. And with little to no American bloodshed. Forty years ago this April, our nation lost the Vietnam War – a war that America could easily have won, and should have.  South Vietnam had been invaded by North Vietnam, although the conflict was portrayed by communist apologists […]

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The First Patriots’ Day

The First Patriots’ Day

on April 18, 2015, 6:48 AM / in History, National News, Opinion

The Roots of the First American Revolution “If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude than the animating contest of freedom, go from us in peace. May your chains sit lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen!” –Samuel Adams (1776) On April 19th, we honor the anniversary of Patriots’ Day and the […]

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‘The Nation’ of Tyranny Lovers

‘The Nation’ of Tyranny Lovers

on March 15, 2015, 5:30 AM / in History, National News, News, Opinion

In 1951, Chinese and North Korean forces had captured a charred Seoul, the atom bomb spies were sentenced to death and Clement Greenberg was the leading art critic in America. As The Nation’s art editor, Greenberg had helped put American art on the map. And as the war with Nazi Germany gave way to the war with the Soviet Union, […]

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Why I Stopped Wearing Green On St Patricks Day

Why I Stopped Wearing Green On St Patricks Day

on March 15, 2015, 5:30 AM / in History, National News, News

A few years ago, I was informed by a co-worker about more than the usual superficial nature of St. Patrick’s Day. I encourage you to do a little research on your own, if you feel led; it isn’t of particularly earth shattering importance, but interesting to know, nevertheless. (There are many things more important, like defeating Obamacare, etc.) This won’t […]

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This Day in Liberal Judicial Activism—February 20

on February 20, 2015, 5:30 AM / in History

By  Ed Whelan 1980—Justices Brennan, Marshall, Blackmun, and Stevens dissent from Justice White’s majority opinion in Committee for Public Education v. Regan, which rules constitutionally permissible a New York statute authorizing the use of public funds to reimburse private schools (both religious and secular) for performing various testing and reporting services mandated by state law. The dissenters would have permitted a […]

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