History

Sanders, Socialism, and Schooling

Sanders, Socialism, and Schooling

on March 16, 2017, 6:00 AM / in History, National News

Owing to his enthusiasm for the Soviet Union during the Cold War (he actually spent his honeymoon there!), Bernie Sanders was indeed morally unfit to have ever be President of the United States, as Independent Institute Senior Fellow Lawrence J. McQuillan argues in The Beacon. According to a recent poll, however, the senator’s socialist credentials pose no problem for one-fourth of […]

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When it comes to CON’s, Money is not an object in government.

When it comes to CON’s, Money is not an object in government.

on March 11, 2017, 6:00 AM / in History, Local News, National News, State News

There has been this growing fascination again with publicly funded broadband networks, and for God’s sake, I don’t understand why. If history has taught us anything, it is that private-sector investment, like most anything else, is to be preferred strongly in building telecommunications networks. Of course, I have been discussing this issue for what seems to be an eternity and there is […]

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WILL THE INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY KILL TRUMP?

WILL THE INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY KILL TRUMP?

on March 8, 2017, 8:23 AM / in History, News, Opinion

I was only 14 years of age when President Kennedy was assassinated. I was just being driven home from church with my parents when the radio announced that prime suspect Lee Harvey Oswald had been shot. I knew right then that the Kennedy assassination was a conspiracy, and the Warren Report that followed confirmed my suspicions. So when I began […]

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Djedkare Isesi

Djedkare Isesi

on February 21, 2017, 6:00 AM / in History

Djedkare Isesi was an Ancient Egyptian pharaoh, the eighth ruler of the Fifth Dynasty in the late 25th century to mid 24th century BCE, during the Old Kingdom period. He likely enjoyed a reign of over 40 years, which heralded a new period in the history of the Old Kingdom. Breaking with a tradition followed by his predecessors since the […]

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President’s Day

on February 20, 2017, 9:37 AM / in History

Washington’s Birthday is a United States federal holiday celebrated on the third Monday of February in honor of George Washington, the first President of the United States, who was born on February 22, 1732. It can occur on the 15th through the 21st of February inclusive. Traditionally celebrated on February 22—Washington’s actual day of birth—the holiday became popularly known as […]

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Cicero and Obama

Cicero and Obama

on February 18, 2017, 6:00 AM / in History, Opinion

By Eileen F. Toplansky   /   The American Thinker The importance of Cicero in Western thought cannot be underestimated. According to Garrett Lysford, the “American Republic is hardly a new idea and is in fact a mere innovation of a far more ancient political system: The Roman Republic.” The Founders “especially revered Cicero for his ardent patriotism, poisonous contempt of demagogues, […]

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The Crescent Honeyeater

The Crescent Honeyeater

on January 30, 2017, 6:00 AM / in History

The crescent honeyeater (Phylidonyris pyrrhopterus) is a bird native to southeastern Australia, in the honeyeater family. It is fairly nondescript, with dark grey plumage and paler underparts highlighted by yellow wing patches and a broad, black crescent, outlined in white, down the sides of its breast. The female is a little duller than the male. The male sings a complex […]

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Happy Birthday January 29th

Happy Birthday January 29th

on January 29, 2017, 6:00 AM / in History, People

1715,  Georg Christoph Wagenseil, Austrian composer (d. 1777) was an Austrian composer. He was born in Vienna, and became a favorite pupil of the Vienna court’s Kapellmeister, Johann Joseph Fux.  Wagenseil himself composed for the court from 1739 to his death. He also held positions as harpsichordist and organist. His pupils included Johann Baptist Schenk (who was to teach Ludwig […]

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Thomas C. Hindman

Thomas C. Hindman

on January 28, 2017, 6:00 AM / in History, People

Thomas Carmichael Hindman, Jr. (January 28, 1828 – September 27, 1868) was a United States Representative from Arkansas before serving as a major general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. During the Mexican–American War, he became a captain of his company. He was a member of the Mississippi House of Representatives from 1854 to 1856, and […]

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Why firing squads and other execution methods remain constitutional

Why firing squads and other execution methods remain constitutional

on January 27, 2017, 6:00 AM / in History, National News

By Scott Bomboy  The Supreme Court’s move to rule on using lethal injections for capital punishment is the latest legal debate in a controversy that goes back to the Founding Fathers. But one Eighth Amendment issue rarely defined by the Court is the general method of executions. As the case of Glossip v. Gross heads to the Court for a […]

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American Minute with Bill Federer Chief Architect of Constitution’s views on Religion  – What did James Madison say?

American Minute with Bill Federer Chief Architect of Constitution’s views on Religion – What did James Madison say?

on January 27, 2017, 6:00 AM / in History

James Madison’s defense of religious freedom began when he stood with his father outside a jail in the village of Orange and heard Baptists preach from their cell windows. What was their crime? They were unlicensed –  preaching religious opinions not approved by the government. Madison wrote about the fate of Baptist ministers to William Bradford, JANUARY 24, 17  74: […]

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She Shoulda Said NO!

She Shoulda Said NO!

on January 25, 2017, 6:00 AM / in History

“She Shoulda Said ‘No’!” is a 1949 exploitation film in the spirit of morality tales such as the 1936 films Reefer Madness and Marihuana. Directed by Sam Newfield (listed as Sherman Scott) and starring Lila Leeds, it was inspired by the 1948 arrest of movie stars Robert Mitchum and Leeds for marijuana possession. The actors, along with two others, were […]

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The Epochal Consequences Of Woodrow Wilson’s War

The Epochal Consequences Of Woodrow Wilson’s War

on January 23, 2017, 6:00 AM / in History, Opinion

By David Stockman  /  David Stockman’s Corner Committee for the Republic Washington DC January 20, 2015 My humble thesis tonight is that the entire 20th Century was a giant mistake. And that you can put the blame for this monumental error squarely on Thomas Woodrow Wilson——-a megalomaniacal madman who was the very worst President in American history……..well, except for the last […]

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Trump breaks with political traditions on triumphant ride to White House

Trump breaks with political traditions on triumphant ride to White House

on January 20, 2017, 6:42 AM / in History, National News, People

Most presidential candidates pick a place close to the heart to announce their campaigns — a childhood hometown, the place they came of age politically or somewhere associated with a political hero. Donald Trump picked the center of his business empire, Trump Tower in New York, and descended a gold elevator to greet the press in an event that analysts […]

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Returning Power to the People

Returning Power to the People

on January 16, 2017, 6:00 AM / in History, News, Opinion

Editor’s Notes: The sad reality is that America is no longer a country run by a government of the people. By Tom Trinko  / American Thinker The great American experiment is based on the revolutionary idea that power flows from the people not the government; the rights of people granted by the Creator, not the Divine right of kings. Lincoln […]

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The Internet Is Threatened By Government Regulation

The Internet Is Threatened By Government Regulation

on January 14, 2017, 6:05 AM / in History, National News, Opinion

By Romina Boccia / TownHall An article to remind you of what has transpired over the last eight years. The Internet is the most marvelous and open information highway humanity has yet experienced. You are likely reading this column on a screen on your laptop, desktop, or mobile handheld device. To reach you, this piece traveled over a broadband network […]

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The Jersey Act

The Jersey Act

on January 13, 2017, 6:00 AM / in History

The Jersey Act was a 1913 regulation by the British Jockey Club and the owners of the General Stud Book that prevented most American-bred Thoroughbred horses from registering with them. It was intended to halt the increasing importation of racehorses of possibly impure bloodlines after a series of bans on gambling by US states, including gambling on horse races. The […]

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John Glenn, ex-senator and astronaut, dies at 95

on December 9, 2016, 7:18 AM / in History, People

Former astronaut and senator John Glenn, the first American to orbit Earth, died Thursday in Ohio. He was 95. Glenn, a clean-cut Midwesterner, had already served as a Marine Corps test pilot when he climbed into the Friendship 7, a small Mercury capsule on the tip of an Atlas rocket that blasted him into space on Feb. 20, 1962. His […]

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Happy Thanksgiving from Erick Erickson

on November 24, 2016, 6:00 AM / in History, Opinion

On June 3rd of this year, after ten years as editor of this site and eleven years as a writer on this site, I told Salem Communications I thought it was time for me to move on. December 31st is my last day here. In January, I’ll focus on radio and television with most of my writing at my radio […]

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Happy Thanksgiving from the Watchdog

Happy Thanksgiving from the Watchdog

on November 24, 2016, 6:00 AM / in History, Opinion

By Erik Telford | Watchdog When the 102 Pilgrims aboard the Mayflower arrived at Plymouth Rock in the fall of 1620, they were greeted by a New World filled with uncertainty, turmoil, and harsh conditions. Only half of the original settlers survived the first year, but despite the hardships faced, the Pilgrims still made it a point to spend time […]

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