History

Judge Declares National Day of Prayer Unconstitutional

Judge Declares National Day of Prayer Unconstitutional

on May 2, 2013, 4:23 AM / in History, Opinion

Three years ago today I copied this article as a reminder how we have pandered to the judicial few. Because of its age I have published this in its entirety. It seems that there is always someone, somewhere, that views symbolic issues as declarations of hatred. I can not for the life of me understand these individuals. The original article is by […]

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Quote for Today

on May 1, 2013, 2:53 PM / in History

“When you see that trading is done, not by consent, but by compulsion” When you see that in order to produce, you need to obtain permission from men who produce nothing When you see that money is flowing to those who deal, not in goods, but in favors When you see that men get richer by graft and by pull […]

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This Day in History May 1st

This Day in History May 1st

on May 1, 2013, 9:31 AM / in History

In 1544, Turkish troops occupy Hungary. In 1701, the Act of Union is enacted; England, Wales and Scotland form the United Kingdom of Great Britain. In 1704, the Boston Newsletter published the first newspaper ad. In 1707, England and Scotland were unified by legislation. There has been an independence movement in Scotland ever since. In 1715, Prussia declares war on […]

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Susan B. Anthony ‘I deplore the horrible crime of child-murder…’

Susan B. Anthony ‘I deplore the horrible crime of child-murder…’

on March 14, 2013, 6:00 AM / in History

Susan B. Anthony, whose face is on a U.S. dollar coin, a 3-cent stamp and whose statue is in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda, died MARCH 13, 1906. Raised a Quaker, her father owned a cotton mill and refused to buy cotton from farmers who owned slaves. Susan B. Anthony’s religious upbringing instilled in her the concept that every one is […]

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This Day in History March 11th

This Day in History March 11th

on March 11, 2013, 6:19 AM / in History

In 105, A.D., Ts’ai Lun invented paper. He made it from bamboo, mulberry, and other fibers, along with bamboo, fish nets and rags. Then he sat around for literally centuries and waited for someone to invent ink. In 222 – Emperor Elagabalus is assassinated, along with his mother, Julia Soaemias, by the Praetorian Guard during a revolt. Their mutilated bodies […]

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Van T. Barfoot

Van T. Barfoot

on March 6, 2013, 3:52 PM / in History, People

I just recieved an email…. that moved around the country last year at this time….. celebrating the life of man, a soldier, a husband and a father. This is his story: Van Thomas Barfoot (born Van Thurman Barfoot; June 15, 1919 – March 2, 2012) was a United States Army officer and a recipient of the United States military’s highest […]

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Quote for Today

on February 25, 2013, 10:20 AM / in History

The philosopher carries his soul in his head, the poet in his heart, the singer in his throat and the dancer in her body. A politician is a lost soul and without voters, a mere scam. While I not sure the author, I have to thank  A. J. Floyd for sending this one. It reminds me of a Quote of Emerson: […]

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One Reason Dollars Ain’t Worth What They Used to Be

on February 23, 2013, 9:15 AM / in History, National News, News, Opinion

Editor’s Note: In this Heartlander article from The Foundation for Economic Freedom, Lawrence W. Reed examines the history of private coinage in the United States. In the article, Reed argues that private coinage was not banned because it did not work, but because the government did not want the competition. “Private coinage was banned not because it didn’t work but […]

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Quote for Today

Quote for Today

on February 23, 2013, 8:39 AM / in History

“Set it, and forget it!” — Ronald Popeil Ronald M. Popeil (born May 3, 1935 in New York City; pron.: /poʊˈpiːl/)is an American inventor and marketing personality, best known for his direct response marketing company Ronco. He is well known for his appearances in infomercials for the Showtime Rotisserie (“Set it, and forget it!”) and for using the phrase, “But […]

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Quote for Today

on February 21, 2013, 10:49 AM / in History

“No morn ever dawned more favorable than ours did; and no day was every more clouded than the present! Wisdom, and good examples are necessary at this time to rescue the political machine from the impending storm.” George Washington (1786) In a letter to James Madison Mount Vernon, November 5, 1786. My dear Sir: I thank you for the communications […]

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Quote for the Day

Quote for the Day

on February 20, 2013, 8:09 AM / in History

“Political correctness is not really about sensitivity and courtesy, which require mutual respect. Rather, political correctness entails intolerance for some prejudices but impunity for others.” James Taranto James Taranto (born January 6, 1966) is an American columnist for The Wall Street Journal, editor of its online editorial page OpinionJournal.com and a member of the newspaper’s editorial board. He is best […]

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Quote of the Day

Quote of the Day

on February 17, 2013, 9:11 AM / in History

America is like a healthy body and its resistance is threefold: its patriotism, its morality and its spiritual life. If we can undermine these three areas, America will collapse from within. Josef Stalin Joseph Vissarionovich Stalin (Russian: Иосиф Виссарионович Сталин; born Ioseb Besarionis dze Dzhugashvili, Georgian: იოსებ ბესარიონის ძე ჯუღაშვილი; 18 December 1878 – 5 March 1953) was the de […]

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Quote for Today

Quote for Today

on February 15, 2013, 4:32 AM / in History

“For it is a truth which the experience of all ages has attested, that the people are always most in danger, when the means of injuring their rights are in the possession of those of whom they entertain the least suspicion.” Alexander Hamilton The Fœderalist (Dawson edition) IT may perhaps be urged, that the objects enumerated in the preceding number […]

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Quote for Today

on February 12, 2013, 3:25 PM / in History

“Nothing strengthens authority so much as silence.” — Leonardo da Vinci Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (April 15, 1452 – May 2, 1519, Old Style) was an Italian Renaissance polymath: painter, sculptor, architect, musician, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer, botanist, and writer. His genius, perhaps more than that of any other figure, epitomized the Renaissance humanist ideal. Leonardo […]

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Reflections on the American Revolution: The Militia

Reflections on the American Revolution: The Militia

on February 4, 2013, 8:00 AM / in History

By: Dan McLaughlin (Diary) How did thirteen colonies, with a barely functioning central government and a thrown-together, underfunded and poorly supplied army of constantly fluctuating size and composition, win the Revolutionary War?  One reason was the colonies’ ability to rely on their common citizens to supplement the Continental Army with local militia.  I’ve looked previously at the demographic and physical […]

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Quote for the Day

Quote for the Day

on February 1, 2013, 4:58 AM / in History

“Never fight ugly people — they have nothing to lose.” “Irish” Wayne Kelly Born  November 19, 1948 in Garden City, New York, The United States Died February 01, 2012 Author of Forget Nam? Never! Get Out and Read a Book… You might learn something “Boxers, like prostitutes, are in the business of ruining their bodies for the pleasure of strangers.” […]

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Quote for the Day

Quote for the Day

on February 1, 2013, 4:35 AM / in History

Of all the arguments for giving amnesty to illegal immigrants, the most foolish is the argument that we can’t find and expel all of them. There is not a law on the books that someone has not violated, including laws against murder, and we certainly have not found and prosecuted all the violators — whether murderers or traffic law violators. […]

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Quote for the Day

Quote for the Day

on January 31, 2013, 4:22 AM / in History

“Born in other countries, yet believing you could be happy in this, our laws acknowledge, as they should do, your right to join us in society, conforming, as I doubt not you will do, to our established rules.” Thomas Jefferson Written in a letter to Hugh White, 1801 Hugh Lawson White (October 30, 1773 – April 10, 1840) was a […]

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Quote for the Day

Quote for the Day

on January 29, 2013, 7:07 AM / in History

“Thus it is that in war the victorious strategist only seeks battle after the victory is won, whereas he who is destined to defeat first fights and afterwards looks for victory.” Sun Tzu, The Art of War Sun Wu  style name Changqing (長卿), better known as Sun Tzu or Sunzi, was an ancient Chinese military general, strategist and philosopher who […]

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Quote for the Day

on January 28, 2013, 2:48 PM / in History

“Whenever action is performed by a great man, common men follow in his footsteps, and whatever standards he sets by exemplary acts, all the world pursues.” Bhagavad Gita The Bhagavad Gita , The Song of the Bhagavan, often referred to as simply the Gita, is a 700-verse scripture that is part of the Hindu epic Mahabharata. This scripture contains a […]

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