History

Solidarity

Solidarity

on August 31, 2018, 6:00 AM / in History

Good morning, it’s Thursday, August 31, 2017. Thirty-seven years ago today, an event took place that signaled the beginning of the end of the Cold War. In the summer of 1980, as the American presidential field narrowed to three candidates — incumbent Democrat Jimmy Carter, GOP nominee Ronald Reagan, and Independent John Anderson — the communist regime in Warsaw responded […]

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Japan officially gave U.S. consent to bring in nuclear weapons ahead of Okinawa reversion accord: document

Japan officially gave U.S. consent to bring in nuclear weapons ahead of Okinawa reversion accord: document

on August 30, 2018, 8:19 AM / in History, International News

Foreign Ministry envoy gave consent ahead of Okinawa reversion pact KYODO, STAFF REPORT  /  Japan Times WASHINGTON – A recently declassified U.S. document confirms that Japan gave the United States its official consent to bring nuclear weapons to Okinawa shortly before the 1969 bilateral accord that led to the occupied island’s 1972 reversion to Japanese rule. The finding is significant because […]

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Meter Man

on July 16, 2018, 7:50 AM / in History

Good morning, it’s Monday, July 16, 2018. Eighty-three years ago today, a maddening — if functional — invention appeared on the streets of our country. It was an American innovation and made its debut in Oklahoma’s capital. The new contraption was the parking meter. During World War I, only 3,000 private automobiles were registered in Oklahoma City and the surrounding […]

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For Those That Believe We Have An UnEqual Justice….

For Those That Believe We Have An UnEqual Justice….

on July 14, 2018, 6:00 AM / in History, Opinion, State News

Steven Hale wrote an interesting report on the history of Tennessee’s Electric Chair in the Nashville Scene and its use in the last 100 years. We have duplicated the report here because of its historical value. 100 years after its first use, Tennessee’s electric chair remains the state’s most prolific killer The Chair The ghosts of Tennessee’s electric chair far […]

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Thoreau’s Way

Thoreau’s Way

on July 12, 2018, 8:33 AM / in History

Good morning, it’s Thursday, July 12, 2018. At the NATO summit in Europe, Donald Trump has treated Europeans to a rhetorical formulation already known to many Americans. “I’m very consistent,” the 45th U.S. president told a reporter from Croatia. “I’m a very stable genius.” That got me to wondering this morning. Not about Ralph Waldo Emerson’s observation about “foolish consistency” […]

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Ferraro’s Moment

Ferraro’s Moment

on July 12, 2018, 6:00 AM / in History

Good morning, it’s Wednesday, July 12, 2017. Thirty-three years ago today, Walter Mondale chose Rep. Geraldine Ferraro of New York as the Democrats’ vice presidential nominee. If you were on the floor of the Moscone Center in San Francisco a week later when Ferraro addressed the convention, as I was, you couldn’t help but feel the import of the moment. […]

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Alaska, Hawaii Statehood

Alaska, Hawaii Statehood

on July 7, 2018, 8:32 AM / in History

Good morning, it’s July 7, 2017. Last night, the Washington Nationals’ brass did something you don’t see every day. They initiated a three-hour rain delay even though it wasn’t raining at game time — and wouldn’t for another two hours. Even then, what came from the skies was a drizzle. Naturally, the team blamed the weather forecasters, but by the […]

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WE SHOULD BE ASHAMED

on July 7, 2018, 6:00 AM / in History, Opinion

By Erick Erickson  /  The Resurgent  We are 241 years removed from the signing of the Declaration of Independence and 236 years removed from the British surrender at Yorktown. It has become abstract to us. It’s ideals are abstract. The causes over which our revolution was fought seem far removed from our everyday lives. It has been simplified by a […]

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Joltin’ Joe’s Streak

Joltin’ Joe’s Streak

on June 29, 2018, 8:52 AM / in Baseball, History

Good morning, it’s June 29, 2018. On this date in 1941, at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C., New York Yankees centerfielder Joe DiMaggio took aim at George Sisler — and the recordy books. Rarely discussed today, Sisler was an uncommonly talented “five-tool” player before that phrase was invented. Toiling mostly for second-tier clubs in a 15-year career that ended in […]

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Party Switching Dems to Republicans

Party Switching Dems to Republicans

on June 27, 2018, 6:00 AM / in History, Opinion

Over the years, we have watched with a certain amount of amusement and concern at the chameleon like ability of elected public officials to move to and fro from party to party without actually having to except the basic platform of the party they are moving to. Since most political party’s are not so much into swearing oaths and more […]

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Almost Heaven

on June 20, 2018, 8:40 AM / in History

Good morning, it’s Tuesday, June 20, 2017. On this date in 1863, West Virginia became the 35th state in the Union, though “Union” was a loaded word then — and very much in doubt. West Virginia had broken away from Virginia at the onset of the Civil War because its people did not want to secede from the U.S. for […]

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Bunker Hill Hero

Bunker Hill Hero

on June 18, 2018, 7:56 AM / in History

Good morning. It’s Monday, June 18, 2018. On this date 243 years ago, Abigail Adams wrote an agonized letter to her husband. John Adams was in Philadelphia at the Continental Congress. Abigail was at their house in Braintree, Massachusetts. From there she could hear the artillery raging in the Battle of Bunker Hill. The letter opens with her signature salutation […]

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Father’s Day! (& a forgotten Founding Father, Samuel Chase)

Father’s Day! (& a forgotten Founding Father, Samuel Chase)

on June 17, 2018, 6:41 AM / in History

The first formal “Father’s Day” was celebrated JUNE 19, 1910, in Spokane, Washington. Sonora Louise Smart Dodd heard a church sermon on the newly established Mother’s Day and wanted to honor her father, Civil War veteran William Jackson Smart, who had raised six children by himself after his wife died in childbirth. Sonora Louise Smart Dodd drew up a petition supported by the Young Men’s Christian Association and […]

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The WILD women who ruled the West

The WILD women who ruled the West

on June 16, 2018, 6:00 AM / in History

In my family ancestors  —   Calamity Jane   aka  Martha Jane Cannary In my family history research it was a surprise to learn that Calamity Jane was one of the limbs in my family tree – the branch that my maternal grandfather was from. Just as it was a surprise to learn that on my Paternal branches was Andrew J. Still […]

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Lincoln’s Prescient Words

Lincoln’s Prescient Words

on June 16, 2018, 6:00 AM / in History

Good morning, it’s Friday, June 16, 2017. One hundred and fifty-nine years ago today, a former one-term congressman from Illinois delivered one of the most momentous political orations in American history. “A house divided against itself cannot stand,” Abraham Lincoln told an audience of Illinois Republicans at the state capitol in Springfield, Illinois. “I believe this government cannot endure, permanently, […]

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‘Nuclear Option’; Scoring the CBO; Defense Spending; Management Lessons

on March 24, 2018, 8:31 AM / in History, Opinion

Thirty years ago today, management guru Peter F. Drucker wrote a scathing critique of how the White House operated under Ronald Reagan — at least regarding the festering controversy known as the Iran-contra scandal. The president was a longtime fan of Drucker’s, who was only 15 months older, and had followed his work longer than most. Each man had been […]

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What Would Patrick Henry Say Today?

What Would Patrick Henry Say Today?

on March 24, 2018, 6:00 AM / in History, Opinion

On March 23rd in 1775, Patrick Henry delivered the most famous speech ever given on American soil. It was his immortal “Give Me Liberty Or Give Me Death” speech. He gave the speech to the Virginia House of Burgess in Richmond. The question before the delegation was whether the Colony of Virginia would join the fight for independence from Great Britain. […]

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Elcor, Minnesota

Elcor, Minnesota

on March 18, 2018, 5:52 AM / in History

Elcor is a ghost town in the U.S. state of Minnesota that was inhabited between 1897 and 1956. It was built on the Mesabi Iron Range near the city of Gilbert in St. Louis County. At its peak around 1920, Elcor had two churches, a post office, a general store, a primary school, a railroad station and its own law enforcement, and housed a population of nearly 1,000. Elcor was a mining […]

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News From Real Clear Politics March 16, 2018

on March 16, 2018, 8:44 AM / in History, National News

We Don’t Need Government to Regulate the Internet. Ryan Hagemann explains why in RealClearPolicy. Bear Stearns Bailout Didn’t Avert Financial Crisis — It Was the Crisis. In RealClearMarkets, Peter Wallison looks back on the 10-year anniversary of the federal rescue of the investment bank. If You Need an Inclusion Rider to Make It in Movies, You Won’t. Also in RCM, […]

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This Day in Liberal Judicial Activism  Read more at: http://www.nationalreview.com/bench-memos

This Day in Liberal Judicial Activism Read more at: http://www.nationalreview.com/bench-memos

on February 11, 2018, 6:37 AM / in History

In 1947 – In Everson v. Board of Education, the Supreme Court misconstrues the Establishment Clause as erecting a “wall of separation” between church and state. As law professor Philip Hamburger demonstrates in his magisterial Separation of Church and State (Harvard University Press, 2002), there is no legitimate basis for reading the Establishment Clause to impose a regime of separation […]

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