How To Treat Halloween

The memory of the righteous is blessed, but the name of the wicked will rot. —Proverbs 10:7

The word Halloween comes from All Hallows Eve, which was the evening before a religious holiday in Medieval England that became known as All Saints’ Day. It was a time set aside by the church to commemorate its saints.

Today’s celebration of Halloween, however, is more closely related to pagan customs that originated in ancient Europe. The Druids believed that the spirits of the dead returned to their former haunts during the night of October 31, so they lit torches and set out food for these unwelcome visitors. They did this out of fear, thinking they would be harmed if they didn’t.

The Bible warns against all dabbling in the occult and preoccupation with witches and ghosts. What then can Christians do? One enterprising pastor had a special gathering in which he asked some of the church people to come dressed in the costumes of Bible heroes and the great saints of church history. In a dramatic way they were calling to mind the sufficiency of God’s grace in the lives of His people.

Yes, the example set by that great “cloud of witnesses” in Hebrews 12:1 encourages our faith. Remembering them on Halloween can remind us of the triumph of trusting the Lord.

Faith of our fathers, living still
  In spite of dungeon, fire, and sword—
  O how our hearts beat high with joy
  Whene’er we hear that glorious word!

Faber

The greatest gift anyone can give us is a godly example.

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