How Ghislaine Maxwell was nabbed by the FBI via her cellphone

How Ghislaine Maxwell was nabbed by the FBI via her phone

Ghislaine Maxwell, seen here in a courtroom sketch, appears via video link during her arraignment hearing in July.REUTERS

Ghislaine Maxwell spotted the agents, heard them shout “FBI” and ran to another room inside her secluded New Hampshire compound, slamming the door behind her.

On a desk was a cellphone wrapped in tinfoil, a clue that prosecutors claim shows just how far the accused sex trafficker went to avoid being traced. But the cellphone was her undoing after months in hiding, one she used under the name “G Max” to talk with secret husband Scott Borgerson.

On July 2, two dozen agents stormed the compound and arrested Maxwell for allegedly conspiring with ex-lover and convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein to lure and groom teenage girls for him. She has pleaded not guilty to the charges; he killed himself in jail.

The FBI had been tracking the British socialite’s number with cell tower data, but couldn’t come any closer than a square mile of her exact whereabouts. So, the feds turned to cellular intercept, a technology that NYU professor Ted Rappaport helped pioneer.

Every cellphone has two unique numbers — a Mobile Identification Number (MIN) and an International Mobile Subscriber Identity (IMSI) — that make tracking the location possible, Rappaport told The Post.

Ghislaine Maxwell spotted the agents, heard them shout “FBI” and ran to another room inside her secluded New Hampshire compound, slamming the door behind her.

On a desk was a cellphone wrapped in tinfoil, a clue that prosecutors claim shows just how far the accused sex trafficker went to avoid being traced. But the cellphone was her undoing after months in hiding, one she used under the name “G Max” to talk with secret husband Scott Borgerson.

On July 2, two dozen agents stormed the compound and arrested Maxwell for allegedly conspiring with ex-lover and convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein to lure and groom teenage girls for him. She has pleaded not guilty to the charges; he killed himself in jail.

The FBI had been tracking the British socialite’s number with cell tower data, but couldn’t come any closer than a square mile of her exact whereabouts. So, the feds turned to cellular intercept, a technology that NYU professor Ted Rappaport helped pioneer.

Every cellphone has two unique numbers — a Mobile Identification Number (MIN) and an International Mobile Subscriber Identity (IMSI) — that make tracking the location possible, Rappaport told The Post.

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