3 faith headlines

Then-Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin tries to comfort an upset Graham Higdon, held by his father James Higdon, during a campaign stop at a Chick-fil-A restaurant during the lunch hour on Tuesday, May 19, 2015, in Louisville, Ky. Candidates Matt Bevin, James Comer and Hal Heiner are in a tight race to decide who will represent the Republican Party in November against likely Democratic nominee Jack Conway to be elected governor of Kentucky. (AP Photo/David Stephenson)

Then-Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin tries to comfort an upset Graham Higdon, held by his father James Higdon, during a campaign stop at a Chick-fil-A restaurant during the lunch hour on Tuesday, May 19, 2015, in Louisville, Ky. Candidates Matt Bevin, James Comer and Hal Heiner are in a tight race to decide who will represent the Republican Party in November against likely Democratic nominee Jack Conway to be elected governor of Kentucky. (AP Photo/David Stephenson)

By W. Scott Lamb  /   Washington Times

1| Christians should be praying for Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin regularly. Looking to raise money for Planned Parenthood, “Musicians Attack Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin With Tune ‘Crotch Crucifix’“ |Breitbart

A coalition of more than 40 musicians is promoting a digital compilation of songs titled “We Have a Bevin Problem” to protest Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin’s pro-life and conservative policies.

The musicians contributed songs with titles such as “Can You Show Me on the Doll Where Mr. Bevin Touched You?” and “Crotch Crucifix” to attack Bevin for following through with his gubernatorial campaign platform.

“Musicians in Kentucky responded in song to the attacks on women’s reproductive rights, affordable health care, the LGBTQIA+ community, education and progress in general in our beloved state through song,” the organizers of the 43-track compilation say.

Other song titles on the compilation include: “So Called Christian Politician” by Tyler Gill, “Heap of His Heart” by American Lesions, “Liar” by Babe Rage, “Birthing Slavery” by Civilian, and “Lunatic, You Make Me Sick” by D.W. Box.

…Nevertheless, national pro-life leader Lila Rose, president of Live Action, tells Breitbart News, “Gov. Bevin is doing his job, stopping an unlicensed abortion facility and standing up for the safety of Kentucky’s women and their preborn children.”

“It’s too bad that these people don’t bother to research who they’re so blindly supporting — a corporation that kills nearly 900 preborn children each day in the United States, and one that thinks it’s above the law in Kentucky,” she added.


2| Pastor Tim Keller: How Christians Can Bear Gospel Witness in an Anxious Age |Christianity Today

…Our engagement in the world in an anxious age is made possible by our confidence in the gospel in a pluralistic society where people have profoundly different beliefs. We won’t always be able to persuade those around us that our beliefs are right and theirs are wrong. Indeed, some of our most important beliefs stem from contested premises that others do not share. But recognizing the existence of these disagreements should not prevent us from holding to what is ultimately true. Our beliefs can be true, and we can hold these warranted beliefs confidently even though others reject them. For this reason, recognizing the social fact of difference should not be mistaken as relativism. To the contrary, a greater awareness of our distinctiveness that comes from confidence in the gospel can encourage us to work to strengthen the social fabric for the good of others.

This kind of posture is what one of us has called “confident pluralism.” As Christians, we can engage with the pluralism around us because our confidence lies elsewhere. We can acknowledge genuine differences in society without suppressing or minimizing our firmly held convictions. We can seek common ground even with those who may not share our view of the common good.


3| Pastors on politics: biblical, not controversial |Baptist Press

…Refusing to vote is not an option, said Jack Graham, pastor of Prestonwood Baptist Church in Plano, Texas.

“You can’t sit this one out. You can’t say, ‘I’m not going to participate.’ The stakes are too high,” said Graham, a former SBC president.

“Isn’t it great to know, number one, that God is not in heaven wondering, ‘What am I going to do with Donald or Hillary?,’” he said, adding, however, Christians are responsible to act in the election. “[W]e simply must not abdicate our responsibility to pray, to participate, to vote and, as pastors and leaders in our churches, to encourage others to do the same.”

He is focusing on three primary considerations in determining how to vote in this presidential election, Graham said: (1) A candidate who will seek God’s wisdom in making Supreme Court nominations; (2) someone who will support the sanctity of human life; and (3) a person who will defend religious liberty.

K. Marshall Williams, senior pastor of Nazarene Baptist Church in Philadelphia, Pa., and another former NAAF president, said the church needs to be “passionately praying” for those in authority.

Also, he said, Christians should “maintain a collective, incarnational, redemptive presence in the church and in the culture.” The church should not only address such issues as the sanctity of life and religious freedom, but “attack systemic racism and injustice in our land,” Williams said, and “be concerned about the pipeline from school to prison, that one out of every three African-American men are tied to the criminal justice system.”

In addition to being biblical in his approach, McKinley said he seeks to be: (1) “instructional and not just emotional;” (2) “pastoral and not just simply be political;” (3) “convictional, not just informational;” and (4) “hopeful and not cynical.”

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