Mulvaney: Funding Corporation for Public Broadcasting ‘a Hard Sell’ That Can’t Be Defended Anymore

Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney (AP Photo)

(CNSNews.com) – When asked whether the president would veto any appropriations bills that fund agencies or programs like the Corporation for Public Broadcasting in defiance of the president’s “America First” budget blueprint, which defunds them, Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney said the administration would work with Congress to decide whether or not to sign appropriations bills or to veto them “at the appropriate time.”

Mulvaney said Thursday that is “a really hard sell” to working class Americans to give their hard-earned money to government agencies and programs like the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

That’s why programs like the CPB and the National Endowment for the Arts are being defunded in the president’s “America First” budget blueprint, Mulvaney said at the White House press conference.

CNSNews.com asked Mulvaney, “The president has called for eliminating funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcast and the National Endowment for the Arts. If the Republican Congress sent the president appropriation bills that fund CPB and NEA, will he veto those bills and tell the Republican leadership to send bills that defunds those things?”

Mulvaney said the president wanted to send a “simple message.”

“The message the president sent right now is that we want to defund those, and there’s completely defensible reasons for doing that. It’s a simple message, by the way. I put myself in the shoes of that steelworker in Ohio, the coal-mining family in West Virginia, the mother of two in Detroit, and I’m saying, okay, I have to go ask these folks for money, and I have to tell them where I’m going to spend it,” Mulvaney said.

“Can I really go to those folks, look them in the eye and say, look, I want to take money from you, and I want to give it to the Corporation of Public Broadcasting? That is a really hard sell, in fact, some of you don’t think we can defend anymore,” he said.

“As to specific vetoes,” Mulvaney said, “you and I both know it doesn’t come over one by one, line item by line item doesn’t come over. They come over in large appropriations bills, and we’ll work with Congress to go through the appropriations process, and we’ll make determinations on whether or not to sign appropriations bills or veto them at the appropriate time.”

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