The White House and the Rest of The World: Busy Week for the President

US President Donald Trump (left) with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, May 23, 2017. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images via JTA)

US President Donald Trump (left) with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, May 23, 2017. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images via JTA)

The president has a big week ahead, including a consequential NATO summit in Brussels, and meetings outside London with British Prime Minister Theresa May and Queen Elizabeth II. A week from today in Helsinki, Trump meets one-on-one with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

In Brussels, Trump will continue to urge NATO allies to boost their defense budgets, while relations between the president and some world leaders are increasingly strained. Here are five issues to watch at the annual summit (The Hill). … NATO, under fire from Trump, is expected to trumpet its heightened readiness (The Wall Street Journal). … Ahead of the NATO and Putin summits, Trump’s unorthodox diplomacy rattles allies (The Washington Post).

Anticipating demonstrations and protests while in the United Kingdom for four days (including two days in Scotland), Trump will largely avoid downtown London while meeting with May and the queen (The Guardian). … Among the vivid anti-Trump displays expected in the city: A giant balloon depicting the U.S. president as a rotund baby wearing a diaper (The New York Times). … The White House says the president is unconcerned about protesters and is more “beloved” around the world than some of his predecessors (The Times of Israel).

Trump’s agenda during his upcoming meeting with Putin remains somewhat open-ended, much to the consternation of German officials, who say there has been no coordination with NATO allies leading up to the Putin meeting. They fear Trump might allow the Russian president to exploit Trump’s determined avoidance of any friction (Reuters). His disposition toward Putin is decidedly warm, while the State Department’s official stance with Russia is less so:

North Korea: And speaking of chilly diplomacy, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo found a rough reception in Pyongyang last week while discussing denuclearization. He did not meet with Kim Jong Un, and while the secretary called the talks “productive,” the North Korean officials were scornful (Bloomberg). … Pompeo sees a bumpy road ahead (Reuters). … The United States and North Korea are still at odds on all issues of denuclearization drawn from the Trump-Kim summit last month (The Associated Press).

Pompeo, as America’s top diplomat, remains a notable example of the “big personality appointees” the president was drawn to for his Cabinet. But as marquee leaders exit departments and agencies, Trump’s executive team is slowly becoming populated with technocrats, reports The Washington Post.

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